Clubroot

Clubroot has been detected in Yellowhead County. Clubroot is a soil-borne disease that reduces yields of cruciferous crops such as canola, mustards and some vegetables. The disease causes galls or clubs to form on the root systems of infected plants which then restricts the nutrient and water uptake of the plants reducing the yields of crops. The higher rate of the infection of clubroot in the soil, the more severe the yield loss in the crop will be. 

Yellowhead County Pest Inspectors will be scouting for this disease in canola and other Brassicaceae fields throughout Yellowhead County from approximately August 28th - September 30th. Scouts will be taking all possible preventative measures to limit the spread of the disease. 

The primary way this disease spreads is by soil movement from infected fields to non-infected fields. This may be done by soil falling off of farm machinery, vehicles, and off-highway vehicles. It may also be spread by wind and water erosion. Equipment sanitation is essential to preventing the establishment of clubroot. 

 

Rotation of crops is highly recommended to prevent the severity of clubroot in one's fields. Continuous cropping of canola may increase the likelihood and severity of infection. There are no treatments currently available for clubroot infected fields/plants so prevention practices are highly recommended. Some things you can do to prevent the establishment of clubroot as:

Check fields regularly and look for abnormalities such as galls and/or clubs on roots, premature ripening and/or wilting plants

Sanitize machinery, vehicles and equipment before moving into a new area with a solution of 1% bleach and 99% water

Use clubroot resistant varieties of seed for planting 

 In 2015 a new clubroot pathotype was confirmed in the Edmonton region that is able to overcome resistant varieties of seed. Dr. Stephen Strelkov at the University of Alberta looked at samples collected from several fields and was able to verify higher levels of infection than expected in some clubroot resistant varieties. “This is a different pathotype that none of the commercially available clubroot resistant varieties in Western Canada are effective at managing,” says Strelkov. 

The Canola Council of Canada has advised that canola growers and agronomists scout their clubroot resistant varieties this summer with extra effort and vigilance. A focused survey in the Edmonton region has been underway to help better understand the pathogen’s prevalence and distribution.

Please see www.clubroot.ca for more details or contact the Yellowhead County Agricultural Department in the Wildwood County Office at: 53404 Rge Rd 92A or call toll free: 1 800 814-3935

With fall approaching it is time once again to remember that clubroot has been detected in Yellowhead County. Clubroot is a soil-borne disease that reduces crops such as canola, mustards and some vegetables.

The primary way this disease spreads is by soil movement from soil falling off of farm machinery, vehicles, and off-highway vehicles. It may also be spread by wind and water erosion.

For detailed tips on preventing the spread of clubroot go to www.yellowheadcounty.ab.ca.

For a more detailed article please see the attached document.

Open Farm Days

Bus Tour & Lunch - August 18, 2018

Self Guided Driving Tour - August 18 & 19, 2018

Bus Tour & Lunch - One Day Only! Get your tickets early.

For 2018 we're visiting four local farms as part of the bus tour and lunch on Saturday, August 18 for only $40. Get your tickets online at www.bit.ly/YCABOFD2018tix

Farmer _Kid-CWJ-AOFD-2018-3728_web2

You can also take the Self-Driving Tour to visit the farms on Saturday, August 18 and Sunday, August 19 (not all farms are open Sunday to the public).

Check out directions and other participating farms at www.albertafarmdays.com 
(
Search: Wildwood, Evansburg, and Mackay)

Self- Driving Tour Days:

Wild Country Gardens - Sat. & Sun
Violet Gardens & Greenhouse - Sat. Only
Ophus Ranch - Sat. & Sun
Leaman Exchange - Sat. & Sun
Stonepost Farms - Sat. & Sun
Cold Creek Farm and Campground - Sat. & Sun
U-Pick It - Sat. Only

 

AOFD 2018_Postcard_for_Tour_2

 A write-up by local food blogger Cooking With Jax on each of the farms and some amazing photos for each of the 2018 farms can be found on www.cookingwithjax.com and some cool videos on her Facebook page @CookingWithJax

CWJ -_Leaman_Exchange-7847

Mountain Pine Beetles - What Can You Do?

Yellowhead County Residents play an important role in managing the mountain pine beetle infestation. Early detection and control are critical in managing Alberta's MPB infestations and preventing further spread.

 Mountain Pine Beetle MPB Reporting Information Fillable Form

The MPB app can be found at www.pinebeetleapp.ca.

mountain pine_beetle_pitch_tube

Background: Mountain Pine Beetle is an insect with the potential to devastate landscapes.  A large MPB outbreak started in British Columbia in the early 1990s. Since that time the insect has killed about 50% of the total volume of commercial lodgepole pine in that province. While isolated records of MPB had been noted in Alberta before, it was the massive migration of beetles into Alberta from outbreaks in British Columbia in 2006 that has since fueled the spread in this province.  

 

Mountain pine beetles in your backyard?
The mountain pine beetle is a small, black beetle about the size of a grain of rice. Over the past few years, mountain pine beetles have been expanding east into Alberta from British Columbia.
What type of trees may be attacked?
Mountain pine beetles attack and kill pine trees, usually mature ones aged 80 to 120 years old. All species of pine including lodgepole, jack pine, Scots pine and ponderosa pine are vulnerable. They do not attack aspen, spruce or fir trees. Pine can be distinguished from other trees by their long needles attached to branches in groups of 2-5.
When do beetles attack trees and how long do they stay in trees?
Beetles fly in search of new trees in July and August. Once a beetle has found a suitable tree, it will live in that tree for the remainder of its life and lay eggs. The new generation of beetles will not emerge from the tree for at least one year.
If my tree is attacked, will it die?
Unfortunately, yes. Trees successfully attacked by mountain pine beetles usually die within one year.
How can I tell if my trees have been attacked?
Look for creamy globs that look like crystallised honey, called pitch tubes, and sawdust at the base of the tree and in the bark’s crevices.
What do I do if my tree is infested?
If you suspect a Mountain Pine Beetle infestation on your property, please contact the Yellowhead Agriculture Department in Wildwood for assistance at 1‐800‐814‐3935, or:

mountain pine_beetle_trees

Mountain Pine Beetle Surveys and Control

Mountain Pine Beetle Surveys are conducted on pine trees within Yellowhead County during the month of April and May. Survey crews will require access to private property to conduct surveys and will be able to provide identification upon request.

Funding for the program was provided by the Alberta Agriculture and Forestry through a Mountain Pine Beetle Control Program Grant.

Mountain Pine Beetle Surveys are conducted on pine trees within Yellowhead County this spring. Survey crews will require access to private property to conduct surveys and will be able to provide identification upon request.

Follow up control activities will be conducted throughout the spring until completed. Control activities will remove 100% of mountain pine beetles found through surveys. Control activities will consist of tree removal or removal of beetles from the trees. Only trees that meet current infestation standards set out by Alberta Agriculture and Forestry will be removed.

 mountain pine_beetle_size

For further information contact:

Deci‐con Consultants Ltd.

Harry Ullrich

780-817-3230

Cell: (780) 740‐5143

email   deci.con.consulting@gmail.com

           deci‐con@shaw.ca

 

 OR

 

Jennifer Benson

Yellowhead County Agricultural Fieldman

1-800-814-3935

email   jbenson@yellowheadcounty.ab.ca

 

 

 

Background: Mountain Pine Beetle is an insect with the potential to devastate landscapes.  A large MPB outbreak started in British Columbia in the early 1990s. Since that time the insect has killed about 50% of the total volume of commercial lodgepole pine in that province. While isolated records of MPB had been noted in Alberta before, it was the massive migration of beetles into Alberta from outbreaks in British Columbia in 2006 that has since fueled the spread in this province.  

Custom Herbicide Application Program (CHAP)

 

Custom Herbicide Application Program (CHAP)

Yellowhead County Agricultural Services Board has approved a Custom Herbicide Application Program to control Noxious and/or Prohibited Noxious weeds on private property.

This program will help Yellowhead County residents control weeds where the options of hiring a contractor and renting or purchasing spray equipment is not feasible.  The program will be run on a first come, first serve basis during the spraying season and as weather permits.

Herbicide will be applied onto the private land, not exceeding 20 acres.  Sites will be pre-inspected to determine if the property qualifies for the program and what equipment and herbicide will be necessary.

The landowner will be asked to sign a release allowing the County access to the property and permission to use herbicide as agreed upon by the landowner and Yellowhead County Agricultural Services Staff.  Pricing will depend on the area sprayed and the herbicide used.  Upon completion landowners will receive an invoice for the work performed.

Yellowhead County has added CHAP to enhance services to the residents of Yellowhead County in addition to the existing Roadside Vegetation Management Plan and Weed Inspection Program.

If you would like more information on this or any Agricultural Services Programs or to register for CHAP please contact the Agricultural Services Department in Wildwood at 1-800-814-3935.

Spring Seedling Program

 seedling program

 

With Tree Time opening up ordering year round, residents now benefit by being able to choose tree species, quantities, delivery dates and delivery to their post office boxes. Therefore Yellowhead County is no longer able to offer a service that brings a tangible benefit to residents that matches the investment.

 

Ordering is available from these sources:

 

Tree Time

Prairie Shelterbelt Program

Prairie Tech Propogation

HELP International

 

 

Seedling Pictures

images courtesy of treetime.ca

 

If you are planting trees due to damage from Mountain Pine Beetle infestation, the following grant may be available:

 

Operation ReLeaf


County Offices

EDSON OFFICE (MAIN)

2716 - 1 Avenue,Edson,AB. T7E 1N9
Phone: 780-723-4800
Toll Free: 1-800-665-6030
Fax: 780-723-5066

WILDWOOD OFFICE

53404 Rge Rd 92A,Wildwood,AB.
Phone: 780-325-3782
Toll Free 1-800-814-3935
Fax: 780-325-3783

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